How the World Wars Unmade God in the Late Poems of Djuna Barnes

The last project I was working on before I dropped out of school was about the reasons Djuna Barnes was written out of the cannon of American Modernist literature. I didn't have to look very far to see that the overarching theme of her books is queer misandry. Her peer and friend T. S. Elliot … Continue reading How the World Wars Unmade God in the Late Poems of Djuna Barnes

Blissful Exclusion in Roland Barthes “The Pleasures of the Text”

Last week I read Roland Barthe’s 67page essay “The Pleasures of the Text”. Like most of his work, it is dense, and he continually repeats themes, adjusting and adding to the definitions he is working to establish. In other words, this was a difficult 67 pages, and I feel that I need to write about … Continue reading Blissful Exclusion in Roland Barthes “The Pleasures of the Text”

What My Winter Reading Taught Me About Writing in Five Quotes

Unfortunately, my month of freedom is over. This might be the first time that I’ve ever been sad to return to school, and only part of that is due to ‘senioritis’. After a few years in which I had all but abandoned reading everything but theory, I realized that no matter how much Freud I … Continue reading What My Winter Reading Taught Me About Writing in Five Quotes

Rimbaud’s ‘Paradise of Sorrow’

Arthur Rimbaud is one of those writers who I’ve never been able to connect with. It’s funny because most major writers I don’t enjoy (Hemmingway, Virgil) write about war from a patriarchal perspective. Rimbaud writes of love and misery, my two favorite literary indulgences. Therefore, I decided to spend a few days fully invested in … Continue reading Rimbaud’s ‘Paradise of Sorrow’

The Merits of Maturity and the Place of Self-indulgent Sadness

I’ve been thinking a lot about the comparisons between Robert Lowell’s Life Studies and For the Union Dead and Sylvia Plath’s Ariel. I read one directly after the other, which was entirely coincidental—or at least not conscious. At the end of my post on Ariel, I said that I was relieved to be turning my … Continue reading The Merits of Maturity and the Place of Self-indulgent Sadness

Mania, War, and the Aftermath in Life Studies and For the Union Dead

I recently read Life Studies and For the Union Dead  by Robert Lowell, which is actually two separate books, Lowell’s 1959 book Life Studies, and his 1964 book For the Union Dead. Even though he wrote two books between the two and many after, it makes sense why Life Studies and For the Union Dead … Continue reading Mania, War, and the Aftermath in Life Studies and For the Union Dead